Humans Are Just Embryos, By Star Standards

According astronomical standards, a star that was formed 2 million years ago is considered to still be in its youth.

The earliest known thimbles, made of bronze, were found at Pompeii and Herculaneum. That means thimbles have been around since at least 79 CE.

A Philosophical Comment on Snakes

According to the poet, traveler, and politician Usama ibn Munqidh, who lived in the 1100s CE, "One of the wonders of the human heart is that a man may face certain death and embark on every danger without his heart quailing from it, and yet he may take fright from something that even boys and women do not fear." ibn Munqidh then told the story of a battle hero his father knew, who "would run out fleeing" if he saw a snake, "saying to his wife, 'The snake's all your's!' And she would have to get up to kill it."

Vikings Appreciated Their Wives

Women during the Viking Age were living in a male-dominated society. But that didn't mean they were not appreciated.  The inscription found on a stone in Hassmyra, Sweden – the only verse found on a Swedish inscribed stone that commemorates a woman – certainly seems to show that "women's work" was essential and valued:

The good farmer Holmgaut had this raised in memory of his wife Odindis. A better housewife will never come to Hassmyra who arranges the estate. Red Balli carved these runes. She was a good sister to Sigmund.

DNA sheds light on African history

DNA from ancient remains is used to reconstruct thousands of years of population history in Africa. Researchers sequenced the genomes of 16 individuals who lived between 8,000 and 1,000 years ago, in what is today Malawi and Tanzania. Early on, the researchers found, the indigenous people of southern Africa used to be more widespread. Or their genes were. Markers of what is today southern African descent was found in individuals in Malawi and Tanzania who lived between 8,100 and 1,400 years ago.

But between 8,000 and 4,000 years ago, farming arrived in eastern Africa. Further DNA analysis revealed the hunter-gatherers in eastern Africa had mixed extensively with the incoming farmers. There was also migration from the Middle East in prehistory. About 38% of the ancestry of a 3,100-year-old livestock herder from Tanzania was related to ancient farmers from the Levant region.

How A Bird Became A Person

Did you know that the word "sniper" comes from World War I? Before then, specialist marksmen were called "sharpshooters." But during World War I, British officers began referring to sharpshooters as ‘snipers’, recalling in late 1700s and 1800s when officers stationed in India would go bird hunting in the hills. The tiny snipe bird being one of the hardest of targets to hit. The slang implied that with their newfangled telescopic-sighted rifles, the specialist marksmen could likely hit snipes with ease.

From 1914 the word was widely adopted by the British press, and it spread from there.

A Tiny Carving That’s Making Big Waves In Greece

More than two years ago researchers from the University of Cincinnati unearthed a 3,500-year-old tomb in the southwest of Greece. The tomb belonged to a Bronze Age warrior nicknamed the “Griffin Warrior." Inside were beautiful treasures, which made headlines and challenged previous theories about how Greek civilization developed.

Almost a year after the tomb was found, a new discovery was made. A tiny, tiny sealstone -- just an inch and a half wide. The “Pylos Combat Agate” meticulously displays two warriors engaged in battle with bodies strewn at their feet, with some details less than a millimeter wide. The carving is perhaps most astonishing because it predates artistic skills that were not associated with Greek civilization for another thousand years.

The anatomical precision in the fighter's muscles, for instance, is not seen again until the classical period of Greek art, around 2,500 years ago. Also astonishing? Magnifying glasses were not believed to be used for another thousand years, either. The anonymous artist either had hawk-level eyesight, or the magnifying glass was invented earlier than previously believed.

One tiny seal is upending archaeologists' understanding of how ancient Greek art developed and progressed. It shows a sophistication and interest in true-to-life representational art literally centuries ahead of its time.

  • <
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • >
  • Leave us a message

    HISTORICAL NON-FICTION

    By Lillian Audette

    This blog is a collection of the interesting, the weird, and sometimes the need-to-know about history, culled from around the internet. It has pictures, it has quotes, it occasionally has my own opinions on things. If you want to know more about anything posted, follow the link at the "source" on the bottom of each post. And if you really like my work, buy me a coffee or become a patron!

    Website design and coding by the Amalgama

    About us X