Morocco Still Loves A Good Medieval Cavalry Charge

The Moroccan tradition of Fantasia is a stylized reenactment of a wartime cavalry charge. If done perfectly, a group of horsemen charge in unison, then shoot their muskets at precisely the same time. The audience should hear only one sound. (For those worried, the guns are loaded only with gunpowder, no bullets.)

Also known as lab al baroud (Arabic for “gunpowder game”) or Tbourida, it is practiced in a couple of North African countries and dates back to the 700s CE. During the Islamic Golden Age, only the cavalry charge was practiced. Around the 1200s, the now-traditional musket firing was added. Used to intimidate enemies or impress visitors, the stylized war game would be performed before sultans and kings as well as at local events, like festivals.

Today, Fantasia competitions happen at weddings and the harvest festival. It is practiced by both Arab and Berber communities. And, increasingly, by women. Making Fantasia a sort of unifying national sport in Morocco. Click through the image gallery to see photographs from a 2018 Fantasia, taken by Italian-Morocco photographer Karim El Maktafi.

Earthquake In Mexico Uncovers Hidden Temple

Archaeologists were scanning a Mexican pyramid for damage, after a devastating 7.1-magnitude earthquake in September 2017, and they accidentally uncovered traces of an ancient temple. The temple is nestled inside the Teopanzolco pyramid in Morelos state, about 40 miles south of Mexico City. The pyramid dates to the 1200s CE. It is believed to have been built by the Tlahuica culture, one of the Aztec peoples living in central Mexico.

The temple found inside the pyramid is not large, just 20 feet by 13 feet. Inside were found traces of incense, and ceramic sherds. It is dated to 1150 CE. Which makes it older than the pyramid built on top. Apparently, it was not uncommon for the Tlahuica to build on top of older structures.

Unfortunately, the pyramid the temple is within did get damaged. Its core was "rearranged" to use one archaeologist's terminology. And two temples at Teopanzolco were also heavily damaged. But from a disaster, a new discovery emerged, and I think that's pretty cool.

Ohaguro: An Interesting Japanese Beauty Standard

Women in ancient Japan blackened their teeth with dye. White teeth were considered ugly. Evidence for this practice, called ohaguro, exists from as far back as the Kofun Period and (250 to 538 CE) in bone remains and on clay human figurines.

Ohaguro continued until the late 1800s and the Meiji Restoration.

Women Scribes: The Technologists of the Middle Ages

Today, most popular representations of manuscript production and scriptoria depict exclusively male spaces. The image that “scriptorium” conjures up is that of robed men laboring over texts. Yet, women had a very real place in developing, maintaining, and innovating this arduously crafted technology, using it to share visions, communicate with each other, and create works of staggering beauty and insight. Read the full article on medieval women's importance as scribes and writers  

The chrysanthemum was brought to Japan around the beginning of the Heian period (794−1185). By the Edo period (1600 - 1868) hundreds of types of chrysanthemums were being cultivated. These pages come from Gakiku, the first picture book of chrysanthemums published in Japan, in 1691. Its beautiful illustrations and Chinese-style poems introduced readers to 100 different varieties of the flower.

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    HISTORICAL NON-FICTION

    By Lillian Audette

    This blog is a collection of the interesting, the weird, and sometimes the need-to-know about history, culled from around the internet. It has pictures, it has quotes, it occasionally has my own opinions on things. If you want to know more about anything posted, follow the link at the "source" on the bottom of each post. And if you really like my work, buy me a coffee or become a patron!

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