It is semi-traditional in Taiwan's Yuan (parliament/legislature) to brawl. They usually occur several times a year, and sometimes several times a month! Punching, hair pulling, throwing plastic bottles, water balloons, and handy cups of water are all common.

The famous Pietà sculpture was the only work by Michelangelo Buonarroti that he signed. Michelangelo heard someone claiming the sculpture was theirs, and carved his signature so they would stop. He later regretted his outburst of pride and swore never to sign another work.

Salvador Dali believed he was the reincarnation of his older brother, who died nine months before Dali was born. This was probably aided by his parents giving him the same first name as their dead son. As an adult Dali painted the above work titled "Portrait of My Dead Brother."

Turkish Stele Found, Mentions Famous King Midas

The stele has hieroglyphs boasting off the conquest of Phyrgia and its king. Phyrgia, an Iron Age kingdom in the 700s BCE in Anatolia, was ruled by a couple of King Midases. But the dating of this particular stele suggests it commemorates the most famous King Midas of myth.

The stone markings also contained a special hieroglyphic symbolizing that the victory commemoration was created by a different king, a man called Hartapu. The hieroglyphs suggest Midas was captured by Hartapu's forces. This makes the stele doubly significant as nothing was previously known about this King Hartapu or the kingdom he ruled. The newly-found stele suggests the giant mound of Türkmen-Karahöyük that the archaeologists were excavating may have been Hartapu's capital city. And it was a big city, sprawling over 300 acres in its heyday.

Around 250 CE, large burial mounds in the shape of keys over top of sunken tombs began appearing in Japan. By the 400s CE these kofun were hundred of meters across. Inside all excavated kofun have been wooden coffins interred with precious grave goods such as bronze mirrors or well-made swords. On the slopes of the mounds are sometimes found terracotta figures used to mark the boundary between the kofun and the outside world. But only the smaller burial mounds have been examined.

Japan does not allow any excavations of kofun over a certain size and which is in the shape of a keyhole. This is because important resting places are believed to have been reserved for divine emperors. Digging into such tombs would be sacrilege. And if archaeologists found something that raised questions about the divine status of the world's oldest monarchy? Well, that would be even worse.

The 1986 rape and murder of 15-year-old American Dawn Ashworth was the first crime to be solved by DNA evidence. Serial killer Colin Pitchfork was identified as the murdered only after another man , who had confessed to the crimes earlier under coercion by police, was exonerated by DNA results.

What is this?

Answer: a candle holder fashioned like a chicken's foot! From China during the Western Han Dynasty, 202 BCE - 9 CE.

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    HISTORICAL NON-FICTION

    By Lillian Audette

    This blog is a collection of the interesting, the weird, and sometimes the need-to-know about history, culled from around the internet. It has pictures, it has quotes, it occasionally has my own opinions on things. If you want to know more about anything posted, follow the link at the "source" on the bottom of each post. And if you really like my work, buy me a coffee or become a patron!

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