First Female Fighter Pilot To Down An Enemy Jet Was Ethiopian! (Probably)

Female Ethiopian captain Aster Tolossa is allegedly the first female pilot to shoot down an enemy fighter jet. She did so in 2000 near Asmara, in Eritrean airspace.

Weird But Wonderful

This weird, kind of amazing glass fish thingy just has to be shared. According to the Walters Art Museum, it dates to the Baroque period in Italy. At the base, "dolphins with entwined tails support the fish, while the wavy patterns on the base represent flowing water." The Milanese family of Sarachi was particularly famous for vessels in the shape of fishes. So they think the Sarachis made this one, probably around 1590 to 1600.


"The life of a good book is far longer than the life of a man. Its author dies, and his generation dies, and his successors are born and die; the world he knew disappears, and new orders which he could not foresee are established on its ruins; law, religion, science, commerce, society, all are transformed into shapes which would astound him; but his book continues to live. Long after he and his epoch are dead, the book speaks with his voice."

Gilbert Highet, on Juvenal. Highet (1906 – 1978) was a Scottish-American classicist, academic, writer, intellectual, critic and literary historian. Juvenal (1st century - 2nd century CE) was a Roman poet who published at least five books of verses. They lived 1,800 years apart, proving the truth of Highet's quote.

A Disappointing Word

The sadly uncommon English word
“fearnought” is “a thick heavy overcoating that is made of wool often mixed with shoddy and that has a rough shaggy face.” Such overcoating is also known as
“dreadnought” according to Merriam-Webster.

I was very disappointed when I discovered the word’s official meaning. Fearnought sounds like such a cool word! And a
“thick heavy overcoating” is simply not as cool as it sounds like the word should be!

Did You Know Australia Has A Mountain Range of Death?

It is called the "Great Dividing Range" and it is the largest mountain range on the continent. But why are mountains deadly?

Giraffes Were Thought To Be What Now?

The ancient Greeks and Romans thought giraffes were an unnatural offspring of a camel and a leopard. Due to the animal's camel-like shape and leopard-like spots. The camel's Latin name is pretty simple: "camelopardalis." Which is how the camel's scientific name came to be "Giraffa camelopardalis."

Archaeological evidence suggests the wheel was invented in Mesopotamia around 4500 BCE. But about 300 years, it was used for making household implements, not transportation.

When the wheel was put on a vehicle, it was only for war, not cargo. With heavy, cumbersome wooden wheels they were perfect for driving through - or over - enemy soldiers. Lack of good roads delayed the wheel’s civilian usage for a couple more centuries.

How Did Elizabeth I of England Use Art As Propoganda?

This video looks not at her more-famous life-size paintings, but her miniatures. How did she convey big political ideas with small portraits? Because no matter how she was being portrayed, Elizabeth I was always a political actor, and conveyed herself as such.

How Did Church Bell Ringing Become An Art?

Bells have been used in Europe since the early middle ages to call people to church services, mark the hours of the day, and sometimes convey signals or warnings. However "musical" bell ringing did not really begin until the 1500s or 1600s.

The first carillon, the array of bells housed in the tower of a church, was created in Flanders, Belgium, in the 1500s. It was slowly refined over decades until it became a huge musical instrument that just happened to be housed in a giant tower. Each bell could be run precisely as the ringer wished, using a system of levers and pedals. The new musical instrument proved popular, and carillons and their beautiful sound slowly spread across Europe.

Lottery Jackpots Can Get Really Big, Wow

The largest claimed jackpot in U.S. history was worth $1.5 billion in January 2016. The winning tickets were sold in California, Texas, and Florida. A tying $1.5 billion jackpot ticket was sold in 2018, but the winner is still unknown.

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    HISTORICAL NON-FICTION

    By Lillian Audette

    This blog is a collection of the interesting, the weird, and sometimes the need-to-know about history, culled from around the internet. It has pictures, it has quotes, it occasionally has my own opinions on things. If you want to know more about anything posted, follow the link at the "source" on the bottom of each post. And if you really like my work, buy me a coffee or become a patron!

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