The archangel Michael, whose cult first emerged in Ethiopia under the patronage of Emperor Zär'a Ya'eqob (ruled 1434–1468), remains the most venerated archangel in Ethiopia. This is largely due to his role as an intercessor on behalf of the faithful. In this folio dating to the late 1600s, Saint Michael rescues the faithful from the flames of hell. And on the facing page, those Michael has already saved are depicted as living safely in paradise.

Have Capuchin Monkeys Entered Their Own Stone Age?

A new study found that Brazilian bearded capuchins at the Serra da Capivara National Park have been using stone tools to break open cashew nuts. But that's not what's amazing. It turns out their ancestors have been doing the same thing -- for about 3,000 years! The tools appear to have evolved over time. The newest archaeological dig has turned up 122 capuchin stone artefacts of varying sizes, and each is thought to cater to a different hardness or type of food. In other words? This group of capuchin monkeys have their own archaeological record, just like a human society! This is the first known example of long-term tool variation ever discovered outside of humans.

Did You Know Azerbaijan Used To Have Burning Mountains?

The country has plentiful natural gas reserves, which sometimes leak to the surface, and spontaneously create fires. Venetian traveler Marco Polo mentioned seeing some of these natural fires when he passed through the area in the 1200s. Unfortunately just a handful still burn. Because they led to a reduction of gas pressure underground, interfering with commercial gas extraction, most have been snuffed out. But a few remain. Including one named "Yanar Dag," which literally translates to "Burning Mountain."

A Pineapple By Any Other Name

Pineapples were cultivated by the Tupi-Guarani indigenous people in South America. In their language, "nana" means "excellent fruit." When the Spanish encountered the pineapple, they called it "pina" from Latin's "pinus" meaning "pine." The French called it "ananas" after the Tupi-Guarani word. And thus the fruit spread around the world with two very different names

Greensleeves, a traditional English folk tune, dates back to 1580! And it was not written by Henry VIII, nor is it likely about a prostitute who stained her clothes...playing...in the grass. At the time green was associated with romance. Rather like pink is today!

Mayan Cave of Untouched Offerings Found

After a villager notified authorities about a cave hidden beneath the Maya site of Chichen Itza, archaeologists crawled hundreds of feet through passages that were only 16 inches high in places. In the cave, they encountered hundreds of undisturbed ritual artifacts, including incense burners depicting the rain god Tlaloc.

Here's the funny part - this was actually the second time this cave was discovered! The cave was first discovered by locals about 50 years ago. At the time, they alerted archaeologist Víctor Segovia Pinto to the find. He ordered the cavern sealed and issued a brief report, which was soon forgotten. Last year, locals once again pointed out the location to archaeologists, and this time they decided to actually investigate it.

This sounds like a bungled opportunity by Pinto but today's archaeologists say it was a boon. Because everything was left in situ, and they plan to leave the artifacts in the cave now, it will remain an intact time capsule that can be studied with the most modern of techniques. Cutting edge 3-D mapping and paleobotany examinations are in the works. And who knows what scientists will come up with in the future? The current plan is that the cave, intact and preserved, will be waiting to be examined by each new generation of techniques.

Tracing Wine's Family Tree

An international team of archaeologists and geneticists have compared the genomes obtained from 28 grape pips, discovered at nine archaeological sites in France, the oldest pip dating to some 2,500 years ago. These genomes were then compared to a modern grape DNA database. One grape seed, unearthed at a medieval site in the center of France and dated to around 1100 CE, was found to have DNA identical to Savagnin Blanc. That's the grape used to produce a wine known in France as Vin Jaune, and in Central Europe as Traminer. The lineage of this one grape has been maintained for 900 years!

The study also found that humagne blanche, a white grape grown in the Swiss Alps, is related to grapes grown by the Romans in southern France. It confirms stories of the Romans bringing grapes and wine into Switzerland.

How long is this necklace?

Answer: just under 15 feet long (4.9 meters)! This Philippines “kamagi” necklace actually 12 necklaces strung together. The places where each necklace comes together is marked by small, colored stones. The individual necklaces are pretty impressive on their own. Because they are made of smooth, interlocking beads the necklaces are flexible, almost snakelike (as you can see in the second photo).

35 Lesser-Known Inventions of Famous Inventors

Some of these inventions were ahead of their time. And some were just weird - like Tesla's 4-foot radio-controlled toy boat

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    HISTORICAL NON-FICTION

    By Lillian Audette

    This blog is a collection of the interesting, the weird, and sometimes the need-to-know about history, culled from around the internet. It has pictures, it has quotes, it occasionally has my own opinions on things. If you want to know more about anything posted, follow the link at the "source" on the bottom of each post. And if you really like my work, buy me a coffee or become a patron!

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