After Brazil joined World War II on the side of the allies in 1942, there were riots against German-Brazilians and their businesses in almost every major city. Brazil is home to the second-largest population of German-Austrians outside of Germany and Austria. The largest population is in the United States.

After Lyndon Johnson died 1973, there were zero ex-presidents still living. This had not happened since 1933, and has not happened since.

Cameroon's national soccer/football team, the Indomitable Lions, has qualified for FIFA competitions six times, more than any other African team. In 1990, they became the first team in Africa to make it to the quarterfinals of the FIFA World Cup. They went on to win the gold medal at the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games.

A banquet of song and dance. Besides showing typical Iranian instruments and clothing in the early modern era, the painting shows what the inside of Hasht Behesht Palace look like. Built in 1669, the royal palace's name means "Eight Paradises."

The painting comes from Isfahan, late Safavid Dynasty or potentially early Zand Dynasty. Artist unknown.

It takes about 5,000 years (give or take) for photons to escape the sun’s core. Once they are out, though, it takes just 8.3 minutes for them to reach Earth. The sunlight we see is thousands of years old!

In their September edition in 1896, National Geographic magazine published this photograph with the caption "The Recent Earthquake Wave on the Coast of Japan." A tsunami had hit on the evening of June 15, 1896. Unfortunately, it was both dark and raining that evening, so few people were outside to see the water recede and warn the villages. National Geographic reported that "A few survivors, who saw it advancing in the darkness, report its height as 80 to 100 feet."

When oxygen was first discovered by British clergyman Joseph Priestley, in 1774, he called it “dephlogisticated air.” Imagine trying to spell that on a science test!

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    HISTORICAL NON-FICTION

    By Lillian Audette

    This blog is a collection of the interesting, the weird, and sometimes the need-to-know about history, culled from around the internet. It has pictures, it has quotes, it occasionally has my own opinions on things. If you want to know more about anything posted, follow the link at the "source" on the bottom of each post. And if you really like my work, buy me a coffee or become a patron!

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