The Successful Daylighting Of A Once-Covered Stream

The photograph shows Seoul's CheongGyeCheon stream in 1904. There were attempts to cover up the stream during the Japanese occupation of Korea but financial difficulties stopped the plans. After Seoul's rapid post-war growth the little stream was finally covered with concrete over 20 years starting in 1958. It disappeared under an elevated highway. Then in 2003, Seoul's mayor initiated a removal of the highway and a restoration of the stream. The development of Seoul and the neglect of CheongGyeCheon meant it was nearly dry and water had to be pumped in. In addition, two historic bridges were restored, and walkways were built along both sides of the stream. When it opened in 2005, CheonGyeCheon was an instant success with the public -- and developers. Land near the stream is now some of the most expensive in Seoul.

The Unknown Russian War

The Russian Civil War was an ideological conflict between competing groups in Russia from 1918 to 1921. It is most famously a conflict between the “Whites” and the “Reds.” The Reds were Bolshevik Communists, and the Whites were those who opposed them. With over 825,000 combat fatalities and 2 million more war-related casualties, the Russian Civil War is considered the most costly civil war in modern times.

Nothing Says Romance Like Shooting A Bow-And-Arrow From Bed

Miniature folio from Bundi, Rajasthan, India, around 1680. It illustrates a scene from the Ragamalas, a series of musical modes that combined poetry, classical music, and art.

How Google Maps Changes Borders, Based On Where You Are

History isn't always linear ... and many countries disagree on how history created where their modern-day borders are.

The Surprising Second Marriage of Jackie Kennedy

On October 20th, 1968, Jacqueline Kennedy married long-time friend and Greek shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis. The world was astonished: though JFK had been dead 5 years, but Onassis was 62 and Jackie was 39. Robert Kennedy had also just been assassinated four months prior. Perhaps the recent bereavement contributed, though. Jackie had been quoted as saying "If they're killing Kennedys, then my children are targets ... I want to get out of this country." Onassis could provide the security and privacy Jackie wanted for her children and herself.

Europe's Early News Network

Did you know that handwritten sheets -- called avvisi -- circulated among the cities and courts of Europe in early modern Europe after public mail routes became common? They were bought on the streets or by subscription, and had information and news from cities like Warsaw, Paris, and Madrid. They sometimes even had information from further afield such as Ireland or the American colonies. It is hard to understand now, by the once or twice weekly avvisi were a revolution in news, connecting Europeans more than ever before.

One newsletter, dated March 19th, 1588, describes the famous Spanish Armada which sailed against Queen Elizabeth I of England. It was described as having "140 or more sailing ships and eight months of provisions" plus "17,000 combat soldiers and 8,000 sailors." The same avvisi also discusses the reconstruction of the Rialto Bridge in Venice, and how problems with pilings were fixed on-site rather than being replaced due to the "inconvenience" of closing the Grand Canal.

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    HISTORICAL NON-FICTION

    By Lillian Audette

    This blog is a collection of the interesting, the weird, and sometimes the need-to-know about history, culled from around the internet. It has pictures, it has quotes, it occasionally has my own opinions on things. If you want to know more about anything posted, follow the link at the "source" on the bottom of each post. And if you really like my work, buy me a coffee or become a patron!

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