Operation Match: The Earliest OkCupid

In 1965, Harvard students used a dating questionnaire and an IBM 1401—an early version of the computer—to match co-eds seeking love. Students would fill out a questionnaire. It would be copied onto punch cards, and fed into the computer, and within seconds 5 potential partners would be spit out. Workers would then mail the results back to the student. The service was called “Operation Match,” and it cost about $3 per person (or about $22 today).

A Massive Nomenclature Coincidence

Denmark has a "Louisiana Museum of Modern Art" which has no connection to the US state of the same name. It just so happened that the property's former owner, Alexander Brun, named his villa after his wives. He had three, and they were all named "Louise."

Today, the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art is quite important in Denmark, and is the most-visited art museum in the country!


"Democracy is not static. It is a living force. Every new idea, every new invention offers opportunity for both good and evil."

Herbert Hoover (1874 - 1964), an American engineer, businessman, and eventual president.

Ancient Mayans Were Beekeepers

Archaeologists in the ancient city of Nakum in northeastern Guatemala recently made a big discovery. Beneath a vast ritual platform dating from around 100 BCE to 300 CE they discovered a foot-long, barrel-shaped ceramic tube with covers at each end. It is nearly identical to wooden beehives still made from hollow logs by Maya living in the region today. Their discovery is the only known Maya beehive. Since most beehives would probably have been wooden, they probably would not have survived.

An Icky Archaeological Discovery

Brightly colored pottery is a hallmark of the Paracas culture (900 - 100 BCE) of southern Peru. They would mark unfired pieces with animals, supernatural figures, and patterns, then add color after the firing process to fill in the design. A new study, recently published in Antiquity, analyzed the chemical composition of the Paracas paints and binding agents. The study found that an organic white pigment on pottery from the Cahuachi site was made from an unusual material: reptile urine! It is unknown -- and a bit difficult to guess -- how the substance was collected and then processed.

Where Are Venezualans Seeking Refuge?

In the past 3 years, it is estimated that 10% of Venezuelans have left the country. Though "fled" might be a better descriptor. Here is a map showing where they went.

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    HISTORICAL NON-FICTION

    By Lillian Audette

    This blog is a collection of the interesting, the weird, and sometimes the need-to-know about history, culled from around the internet. It has pictures, it has quotes, it occasionally has my own opinions on things. If you want to know more about anything posted, follow the link at the "source" on the bottom of each post. And if you really like my work, buy me a coffee or become a patron!

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