A Clever Crossword

On Nov. 5, 1996, (which was Election Day for the presidency of the United States) the popular New York Times crossword puzzle included a surprising clue:

39 [Across]. Lead story in tomorrow’s newspaper (!), with 43 [Across]

The answer for 43 Across was ELECTED. But which presidential candidate fit in 39 Across -- and presumably was the winner of the presidential election? In fact there was not one answer but two. Rather than predict the outcome of the election, the writer of the crossword had managed to make it possible for CLINTON to work and for BOBDOLE to work, by changing the answers to the respective seven down clues. You can read the full crossword here.

Before And After The Bosnian War

The ethnic and religious composition of Bosnia and Herzegovina before and after the conflict (which began in 1991).

Podcast Episode Recommendation on the Industrial Revolution

Hey all! I recently listened to a great podcast episode and thought I would share it with you all. History Extra, run by the BBC History Magazine, is a long-standing podcast of excellent quality. With the pandemic they started an "Everything you ever wanted to know" series on topics ranging from the Aztec Empire to the Renaissance. While the whole series is worth a listen, this post will highlight just one, The Industrial Revolution: Everything you wanted to know. Check it out here.

  These are the people described as Lenin’s inner circle. Four out of thirteen definitely were killed, and two more died of “unknown” causes.

By tracking since the early 1800s, you can tell that the single decade with the most assassinations of heads of state was 1970. The most popular month for assassinations is October.

Women's navels were banned on American TV from 1951 to 1983. Every episode of ever TV show was checked for compliance with the United States Code of Practices for Television Broadcasters -- including for whether a female-appearing navel was ever visible.

Two Women At The Market In La Paz, 1909

The accompanying story, by writer and photographer Harriet Chalmers Adams, declared "If La Paz is a peacock, the market place is its tail."

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >
  • Leave us a message

    HISTORICAL NON-FICTION

    By Lillian Audette

    This blog is a collection of the interesting, the weird, and sometimes the need-to-know about history, culled from around the internet. It has pictures, it has quotes, it occasionally has my own opinions on things. If you want to know more about anything posted, follow the link at the "source" on the bottom of each post. And if you really like my work, buy me a coffee or become a patron!

    Website design and coding by the Amalgama

    About us X