The Takeaway Rembrandt

The famous painter Rembrandt's portrait of Jacob de Gheyn from 1632 is nicknamed the Takeaway Rembrandt because it is quite small and easily stolen. It has in fact been stolen 4 times since 1966! That is the most recorded thefts of a single painting.

Since its independence in 1947, Pakistan has had 22 prime ministers. None have served their full term. All have ended their term early because of assassinations, semi-legal military interventions (or other deposings), or forced resignations.

Temple Complex Remains Found In Southwestern China

A Buddhist temple complex dated to the Tang Dynasty (618–906 CE) has been discovered in southwest China’s city of Dali. The structures contained tons of tiles and pottery. Also uncovered have been 14 foundations for structures, 63 stone walls and 23 ditches, including the remains of brick and tile kilns. Inscriptions suggest the temple may have held the remains of members of the royal court of the State of Nanzhao. This was a state made up of people from the Bai tribe and six tribes from the Erhai Region centered around present-day Yunnan.

In the complex, the researchers discovered a tile inscribed with the characters "Buddha sarira enshrined by the government," which indicates that the Buddhist relics of Nanzhao's royal court are likely to have been enshrined and worshiped inside the temple. The word "sarira" has a variety of meanings in Buddhism. It generally means, though, the remains after a Buddhist cremation. Perhaps this was where Nanzhao's royal family enshrined holy figures, or their own ancestors.

Aztec/Mixtec sacrificial knife depicting a crouching eagle warrior holding a flint blade, bound together with agave fiber and resin. Circa 1400 - 1521.

Drinking in Space? Its More Likely Than You Think

In 1972, NASA officially banned alcohol from space (and the international space station) after booze was proposed to accompany a planned holiday dinner. When news that wine was headed to Skylab started circulating in the press, however, it was quickly taken off the menu and alcohol banned in space. It is well-known that alcohol is regularly consumed though. The Russians, in particular, are notorious for smuggling cognac onboard. The Russian space program officially bans alcohol as well but turns a blind eye. For the most part, the cosmonauts drink the cognac in small quantities during social events with other crew members or before going to sleep, as an alternative to the pharmaceutical sedatives used by American astronauts.

Letters Evidence Deadly Meteorite

Documents found in Turkey's state archives have now been identified as the first recorded evidence of a meteorite killing a human. The evening of August 22, in 1888, an Ottoman village in what is now Iraq was neighbor to a cosmic attack. Letters written by local authorities describe how a nearby city witnessed a fireball in the sky. Then a shower of meteorite pieces plunged to Earth, falling "like rain." One man was killed, as well as another man getting paralyzed, and a nearby field's crops were badly damaged.

Dirk Graham, a Canadian hockey player, was the first NHL player of known African descent to become a team's captain. After retiring as a player, he went into coaching. Eventually he reached the position of Head Coach for the Chicago Blackhawks. That made him the first NHL head coach of known African descent, too.

Who Do You Think Crafted This?

It is an Asante knife and sheath, from what is today Ghana. Crafted from iron, leather, wood, and (surprise!) gold. Circa 1700s - 1800s.

What's A King To A Mob

In 1862, a popular revolt in Greece deposed their King Otto (a long other story) and the country held a rеferendum to ask the people who should be their new ruler. In total 241,202 vоtes were cast. Of those the vast majority, 230,016 votes, went to the British Prince Alfred. He was unable to take the position as he was the heir to the British throne. Another 1,763 votes went to "A King", 482 votes went to "Long Live the Three Powers", and only 6 votes went to Prince William of Denmark, who was eventually appointed.

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    HISTORICAL NON-FICTION

    By Lillian Audette

    This blog is a collection of the interesting, the weird, and sometimes the need-to-know about history, culled from around the internet. It has pictures, it has quotes, it occasionally has my own opinions on things. If you want to know more about anything posted, follow the link at the "source" on the bottom of each post. And if you really like my work, buy me a coffee or become a patron!

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